The advertising industry and racial discrimination in Australia – AdNews

Screenshot from work by Miami Ad School.

UnLtd, the industry’s social purpose organisation, has been contacted by many in the industry following the rise of the black lives matter movement.

In a letter to the industry, Unltd says: “When the protests against racial injustice started, many of you reached out to us to ask ‘how can we help?’

“It was clear that so many feel strongly and passionately about fighting racism here in Australia but many people don’t know where to start and how to help.”

Unltd spoke to some of its charity partners working directly with first nations communities, refugees and other culturally diverse groups, to get their views on what the key challenges are and what the industry and individuals can do to help fight racial injustice in Australia. 

This is what Unltd learned:

The challenge
The first step is acknowledging the issue. Acknowledging that white privilege and systemic racism exists in Australia.

Dr Cath Keenan, co-founder and executive director of Story Factory: “Racist attitudes and behaviours have been built into social structures and institutional practices over generations, and are internalised by individuals, then perpetuated indefinitely. To overcome this we all need to constantly call it out where we see it, challenging the status quo and opening everyone’s eyes to the day-to-day realities and crippling impacts of racism for all those it undermines and victimises.”

Sasha Lawrence, Acting CEO, Reach,  says it is time to unlearn to re-learn: “Just because you don’t say something racist doesn’t mean there isn’t a prevalence of racism. We need to unlearn what we know about racism, re-learn and learn about what anti-racism is about.”

The other key issue is diversity, having true diversity across our organisations and communities, to represent the real multi-cultural Australia. 

“Right now, most executive rooms, leadership teams, positions of power and the people we see on TV screens, do not reflect the diversity that exists in Australia. We need true representation in all industries so that young people of colour and diverse cultural backgrounds can look up and feel like it’s possible for them to achieve. Achieving representation will enable all young people to feel like they can achieve, irrespective of the colour of your skin.”

The one thing that stood out most in all the responses was the importance of education. Educating ourselves but also improving the educational outcomes of first nations communities. The importance of all Australians to understand the truth about colonisation and its lasting impacts and the intergenerational trauma caused.

Dr Rose Whitau from Shooting Stars: “I would love for all Australians to understand the context and history of racial injustice in Australia. For Australians to understand not just the enduring ramifications of European colonisation, but to appreciate the innovation and diversity of peoples who have lived in Australia for 65,000 years; peoples who undertook humanity’s first major maritime voyage, invented edge ground axe technology, bread, and aquaculture.”

Karen Williams, CEO of the Indigenous Literacy Foundation: “Focus on the positive stories; stories about how strong the culture is; how talented the children are, speaking three to four languages before school; and how complex Indigenous culture is; how rich their art, music and literature is; and how strong our First Nations people’s connection to country is.”

Tackling the issue at a young age is also key, both from educating children at an early age, so our children grow up understanding the history of our First Nations people, but also understanding the long-lasting impacts racism can have.

Lawrence: “It’s important for Australians to understand that it begins at a very young age. Young people who are Indigenous are at a significant disadvantage in Australia. We see this in suicide rates, disengagement from school and also how many young people enter in and out of the justice system. Young people who are Indigenous, of colour or of diverse cultural background exert considerable energy trying not to be different, or experience covert racism daily. Things like “you don’t look Aboriginal” or “how come you have an English name” can cause considerable harm to the identity of a young person. Adolescence is complicated enough without needing to overcome barriers to race and identity.”

What can the media, marketing and creative industry do to help fight racial injustice in Australia?

The industry holds power to educate, change attitudes and amplify voices that need to be heard. There are several ways our industry can play a role in fighting racial injustice.

Dr Cath Keenan says the first thing is to “recognise the harm done by perpetuating old, poisonous racist stereotypes. It’s important to pass all content through this filter and expunge anything that does not come up to scratch”.

The second is around true diversity, by changing the face of our industry. Hang Vo, CEO of Whitelion: “The mainstream media, advertising and marketing is almost exclusively represented by white Anglo Australians. This is not representative of multicultural Australia. What we see, read and hear in TV, magazines, adverts, should be a reflection of the diversity that exists in our society.”

Providing balanced reporting was highlighted as another key area to tackle. Sharing honest stories about the issues and struggles but also sharing the positive stories of first Australians, other culturally diverse groups and the many organisations doing great work to help fight racial injustice.

Williams: “Play an active role on educating (and even entertaining) people by focussing on the positive stories; capture the gold – how lucky we are to be able to learn from the oldest living civilisation on our planet.”

Finally, calling out and speaking up on racism in the media. Vo said: “Speak up, don’t be a bystander and conform to powerful shock jocks and media moguls.”

What can an individual do?
It all starts with education. Keenan: “Educate yourself. Read, watch, listen and absorb everything you can being shared by Indigenous Australians right now. They’ve been generous enough to articulate their own personal experience and opinions at a difficult time. The least you can do is show some respect and hear what they’re saying. Open your mind to learning about how life in Australia looks – and feels – to someone who is Indigenous. Be willing to get out of your comfort zone and really understand how different that is to your own experience. Then be humble – and strong – enough to accept what you have got wrong up till now, and what you are going to have to change. Do it.”

Lawrence said it was important to extend our knowledge of Aboriginal history: “Books like Dark Emu enrich our history and paint a very different picture of what colonisation did to Australia. There are so many resources out there for people to learn. One of our favourites has been from the Children’s Community School who have mapped out how race informs a child’s development.”

And go beyond the books for your education. Vo suggests to expand your network of colleagues and friends. Lawrence: “Make it your mission to get to know someone of a different racial background.”

It’s also important to start conversations with colleagues, family and friends about racism and what can be done to stop it. Lawrence: “We actually need to talk about race in Australia. It’s not meant to be comfortable. It should be uncomfortable. But these conversations are critical to shifting hearts and minds and calling out unconscious bias. We are particularly mindful not to rely on people of colour to facilitate these conversations and carry the burden for others.”

Unltd says we all have the power to show kindness and speak up when we see inappropriate behaviour or comments. Call it out when people make racial slurs or jokes.

Finally, a practical way to help is to support first nations businesses and the many organisations that are helping to tackle racial injustice and close the gap.

Here are some ways you can directly support through some of UnLtd’s charity partners:

  • Mentor an Indigenous child through volunteering or donating to The Pyjama Foundation Invest in improving young Indigenous girls educational outcomes by supporting Shooting Stars
  • Help Indigenous and refugee children build their confidence and share their stories with the world by donating to Story Factory
  • Purchase books or donate to Indigenous Literacy Foundation to support their work to publish books in First Languages, written and translated by children and community members in remote Australia
  • Support young Indigenous people through mentoring and skills workshops through Reach and Whitelion.

Have something to say on this? Share your views in the comments section below. Or if you have a news story or tip-off, drop us a line at adnews@yaffa.com.au

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Hitmaker of the Month: Producer Johnny Goldstein Melds Israeli and Latin Grooves on Black Eyed Peas’ ‘Mamacita’ – Variety

Most pop producers pine for a proverbial “big break,” and for Yonatan Goldstein, who goes by Johnny Goldstein, they don’t get much larger than co-production credit on 12 out of 15 tracks from the Black Eyed Peas’ buzzing “Translation” album including breakout hit “Mamacita” featuring Ozuna and J. Rey Soul. The Epic Records release boasts a hybridized, futuristic sound that leans heavily on Latin music production trends, yet is still unmistakably a Black Eyed Peas project. That sound comes not via Miami, Bogota or San Juan, but circuitously via Paris, and Tel Aviv, where Goldstein, Variety’s Hitmaker of the Month, has toiled away for years as both an artist, and now exclusively as a behind-the-scenes songsmith, who is now reaping commercial rewards, thanks to collaborator Will.I.Am.

“I always have been a big fan of Latin music,” Goldstein says via phone from Israel, where he’s working on new projects from his home studio. “A few years ago, I started to really get into J Balvin, Maluma, Ozuna and all those guys and in a funny way, the groove in Latin music is really similar to grooves we have in Israel.”

“It’s not exactly the same,” he elaborates, “but in Reggaeton and in Arabic music, there are a few patterns that are the same…. the tones and frequencies may be different, but the actual notes, on some of them, are the in the same spots on the scale.”

Tel Aviv’s multicultural scene has helped shape Goldstein’s wide palette of influences. “In Israel, you don’t really have genres…. it’s super eclectic,” he says. “I grew up listening to a lot of different styles of music from jazz to classical and hip-hop — Dr Dre and Timbaland, those were my idols.”

Goldstein’s path to landing co-production duties on BEP’s “Translation” has as much to do with timing as it does hard work, as the beatmaker tells it. The 29-year-old first met will.i.am at a BEP writing camp in the winter of 2017 at Paris’ Studio de la Grande Armée. But as with many writing camps where the artist is present, it was hard to immediately make an impression upon a “name” such as will.iam with many other producers in the proverbial mix vying for attention. But Goldstein didn’t give up, and a few years later, after producing music for other European and Israeli artists, found himself in Los Angeles for meetings, when he reached out to the BEP frontman just as, unbeknownst to Goldstein, will.i.am was working on “Translation.”

“I texted Will to see if he wanted to meet up while I was in L.A. last October, and then suddenly I came to his studio [to start working], and since then, we just started to work together on music almost non-stop.”

And while Goldstein had to return to Tel Aviv, he didn’t stop working on songs with Will that would eventually become part of “Translation.”

“I got back to Israel in November, and Will was on tour, and I wanted to continue the connection so we just continued making music throughout the winter,” he says. “I changed my time zone to whatever country that Will was in while he was on tour, so when he was in Australia, I switched my time zone to Australia. When he was in London, I did the same.”

Being available 24/7 seems to have been a strategy that worked out well for the songwriter/producer, as the album’s most popular offerings at the moment were co-written, and co-produced by Goldstein.

Take, for example, “Mamacita,” which is a Top 10 Latin smash this summer in the United States, and buzzing in South America and Europe as well, with nearly 120 million streams on Spotify alone. Now it’s bubbling at terrestrial radio too, and has registered more than 16,500 spins, according to Mediabase.

“We started that one because Will had this idea to use Madonna’s ‘La Isla Bonita’ in a song,” he says of the tune’s genesis. “So, I started a beat with this progression, then he wrote the hook and his parts, and then we did some back and forth with the beat like we always do….which means just hours of Facetime in order to make the production minimal, but super unique.”

“In fact, for the whole album, we tried to keep everything super minimalistic and unique,” Goldstein continues, “but this song in particular is a good example of that.” After the initial, pulsing track (which is set to appear in promos for NBC’s new Peacock streaming service) was done, Goldstein says the group sent it to Ozuna to record his parts. The end result? “Magic,” says Goldstein. “I remember when I heard the whole thing after all the parts came together, I immediately thought this was a smash.”

Another bubbling hit from “Translation” that Goldstein is proud of is “Feel The Beat,” which takes its hook from a 1980s Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam song, and a features Colombian star Maluma. Says Goldstein of the session in London: “Will played me the song he and Maluma did and we built the track around that. We found the Lisa Lisa hook before that and we wanted to somehow connect the points of that song [“Can You Feel The Beat”] with this new song. After the session, I got to the airport, and in the Uber, I continued working on the song with Will via Facetime… we just collaborated further and fine-tuned the beat until it was right after that.”

The producer’s route to working on “Translation” owes much to Universal Music France executive Guenael Geay, who signed Goldstein’s old act The Young Professionals to Polydor France nearly a decade ago. A booster of Goldstein’s talents over the years, Geay got him into the Paris writing camp for BEP three years ago.

“Yonathan is extremely talented and capable to produce almost every music genre,” says Geay. “He also works pretty fast and I’m always fascinated on how quick he can produce a song, being able to play instruments, record, edit, compose, and mix… in 10 years, I think he never missed a deadline for me and was always ahead of schedule.”

So, what’s next for Goldstein? “Right now, I’m doing a lot of stuff for Warner Music and I’m continuing to work with Will,” he says. “I’m super excited about a few records I worked on [with other acts] that are coming out soon, but I can’t say anything yet about these just yet.”

Goldstein is also tight-lipped about a new publishing deal, only revealing that there’s been “a lot of talking” with various interested parties this summer.

The government must recognise the value of an arts-based education – Monash Lens – Monash Lens

Australia is considered one of the most multicultural countries in the world. 

However, as globalisation becomes the norm, and we begin to welcome people from countries with vastly different backgrounds, experiences, ideologies, values and belief systems, how can we harness the power of education to develop intercultural competence and enhance social inclusion?

Education is a powerful medium that can bring positive change. A reconsideration of what we teach, and how, is required in order to account for the social, cultural and economic differences and similarities embodied within the changing society and contemporary student cohort. 

Recent changes to public university fee structures announced by the federal government will see a 113% increase in the cost of humanities degrees from 2021. 

This will disincentivise students from seeking careers in the creative arts and music – a huge blow to not only the arts sector, but to the wider education community. 

Arts and music must remain a critical component of curriculum and school programs. Governments can no longer discount the critical role a music and arts-based education has on not only developing students’ critical thinking capacity, but in promoting social inclusion and intercultural competence in the classroom.

Marching to a future beat 

Music and the arts are essential to the very fabric of humanity, contributing not only to society as an expression of personal and collective identity and social relatedness, but are among the most powerful ways to connect with each other. 

Creativity and critical thinking, innovation, communication, collaborative learning, intercultural competence and socially-inclusive behaviours are non-negotiable 21st-century skills and attributes embedded within the disciplines of music and arts.

Most importantly, music and the arts provide ways for non-English-speaking and refugee students to succeed in the Australian school system, and unite with fellow classmates. 

My recent study, published in the International Journal for Music Education, explored the perceptions, experiences and practices of teachers directly or indirectly involved with the music education program in three Australian schools that have a high percentage of young people with a refugee background. 

Key findings from this research indicate that intercultural competence and socially-inclusive behaviours are embedded in the music learning activities that are student-centred, active, practical, experiential and authentic.

The three Australian schools involved in this 30-week case study have more than 1500 students combined from a number of countries, including Iran, Sudan, Afghanistan, Thailand and Burma. 

All schools delivered the standard Australian curriculum, as well as intensive English-language courses and cultural-immersion opportunities for refugee students. 

Noteworthy contribution to creative and critical thinking, social skills

The music teachers interviewed indicated the experiences and opportunities provided by the practices involved in music-making contributed to their overall academic achievement, and the development of positive personal and social outcomes for all students.

One music teacher said: “Beyond the dots on the page, there is an expressive quality to music that transcends cultural boundaries and academic limitations … engagement with lyrics builds vocabulary, comprehension and pronunciation.” 

Another remarked that some students who found literacy or numeracy difficult, and somewhat confronting, have a chance to excel in music. They said music gave students the chance to develop important personal and social skills, such as self-esteem, confidence, communication and teamwork. 


Read more: COVID-19: Why arts funding matters now more than ever


Creative and critical thinking are embedded within music-making, where experimentation, risk-taking and productive failure are normalised and accepted as an important part of the learning process. 

Students were able to engage with what might otherwise be perceived as risky endeavours in a way that encouraged innovation and different ideas, motivated students to their best, share personal experiences, set personal learning goals, while building confident, resilient and respective behaviours and attitudes. 

A third said: “I have a responsibility to create a learning environment that acknowledges and respects individual differences. So the music program provides a safe and supportive learning community where all students are given opportunities to develop personally, socially and academically. 

Music and the arts can play a critical role in the future of inclusive, practical, and life-changing education.

“Socially-inclusive practices are central to the program, as well as providing creative opportunities that encourage risk-taking in an authentic way … Interdisciplinary learning such as literacy and numeracy are addressed throughout the program as students develop a range of musical skills and knowledge.”

A non-arts teacher interviewed as part of this research had a diverse range of experience. 

One of the most impactful statements came from an English teacher with more than 15 years’ experience, who remarked: “The development that many students have made, and how this [music learning] transfers to other subjects like mine [English] can certainly be attributed to the literacy work addressed in music classes. It is astonishing … I am working with the music teacher to integrate some of these strategies.”

A powerful way of developing social inclusion in the classroom

There was acknowledgement from each of the music teachers about the value of music learning as having both intrinsic and extrinsic value. 

Increasing pressure to justify the value of music in schools has led to the distinction of extrinsic benefits of music as related to academic and/or cognitive development and psychosocial wellbeing, as opposed to intrinsic benefits that relate to direct musical and aesthetic values. 

It was encouraging to observe that in each of these schools, the music programs are designed on the premise that musical participation affords opportunities to enrich human experience in holistic and integrated ways, valuing a balance of intrinsic and extrinsic benefits.

A reconsideration of what, and how, we teach is required in order to account for the social, cultural and economic differences and similarities embodied in the changing society and contemporary student cohort. 

Music and the arts can play a critical role in the future of inclusive, practical, and life-changing education.

The Australian government can’t afford to neglect music and arts as an important tool to develop social capacity, and foster intercultural learning opportunities for all students in the classroom. 

FECCA welcomes appointment of George Savvides as SBS Chair – Mirage News

The Federation of Ethnic Communities’ Councils of Australia has welcomed the appointment of George Savvides AM as the new Chair of SBS, and looks forward to the continuing growth of a public broadcaster that ensures the nation’s diversity is seen, heard and celebrated.

Announced today by the Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts, Paul Fletcher MP, Mr Savvides’ appointment is the culmination of his work in ensuring SBS serves our multicultural society, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, as Deputy Chair from 2017 and more recently as Acting Chair.

“At a highly charged time in which diversity is prominently within the public discourse, Mr Savvides understands the importance of representing the disparate voices and faces and stories of Australians on TV, radio and online,” FECCA Chair Mary Patetsos said.

FECCA has partnered with SBS on many initiatives that have assisted culturally and linguistically diverse communities, and that support will continue.

“SBS reflects a diverse and enriched country and the services provided by SBS are vitally important to people from multicultural backgrounds,” Ms Patetsos said.

“Mr Savvides appointment will ensure the media organisation continues to entertain, inform and serve Australians.”

FECCA is the national peak body representing Australians from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Our role is to advocate and promote issues on behalf of our constituency to government, business and the broader community.

/Public Release. The material in this public release comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here.

Composing school harmony: Music, arts essential for social inclusion – Mirage News

Monash University
  • Music and arts-based education is essential to build cultural capacity in Australian schools, and provide opportunities for personal and academic achievement.
  • Intercultural competence and socially inclusive behaviours are embedded in musical activities that are student-centred, practical and authentic.
  • Governments can no longer discount the critical role music and arts play in achieving social harmony in the classroom.
  • Governments can no longer discount the critical role a music and arts-based education has on promoting social inclusion and intercultural competence in the classroom, new research by Monash University shows.

    The study by Dr Renee Crawford, Senior Lecturer in Monash University’s Faculty of Education, shows music and the arts provide ways for non-English-speaking and refugee students to succeed in the Australian school system and unite with fellow classmates.

    Published in the International Journal for Music Education, the study explores the perceptions, experiences and practices of teachers directly or indirectly involved with the music education program in three Australian schools that have a high percentage of young people with a refugee background.

    Key findings from this research indicate that intercultural competence and socially inclusive behaviours are embedded in the music learning activities that are student-centred, active, practical, experiential and authentic.

    On the back of recent changes to public university fee structures announced by the Federal Government, which will see a 113 per cent increase in the cost of humanities degrees from 2021, Dr Crawford said arts and music must remain a critical component of curriculum and school programs.

    “Music and the arts are essential to the very fabric of humanity, contributing not only to society as an expression of personal and collective identity and social relatedness, but as it remains one of the most powerful ways to connect with each other,” Dr Crawford said.

    “Creativity and critical thinking, innovation, communication, collaborative learning, intercultural competence and socially inclusive behaviours are non-negotiable 21st century skills and attributes that are embedded within the disciplines of music and arts.

    “Government and education authorities can no longer discount the critical role that music and arts education can play in the personal, social and academic development of young people and the intrinsic and extrinsic value that it can bring to each person.”

    The three Australian schools involved in this 30-week case study have more than 1500 students combined from a number of countries, including Iran, Sudan, Afghanistan, Thailand and Burma.

    All schools delivered the standard Australian curriculum, as well as intensive English language courses and cultural-immersion opportunities for refugee students.

    The music teachers interviewed indicated the experiences and opportunities provided by the practices involved in music making contributed to their overall academic achievement and the development of positive personal and social outcomes for all students.

    One music teacher said: “Beyond the dots on the page, there is an expressive quality to music that transcends cultural boundaries and academic limitations…engagement with lyrics builds vocabulary, comprehension and pronunciation.”

    Another remarked that some students who found literacy or numeracy difficult, and somewhat confronting, have a chance to excel in music. They said music gave students the chance to develop important personal and social skills, such as self-esteem and teamwork.

    A number of non-arts teachers interviewed for the study said the skills acquired in music were easily transferable to other subjects, such as English and mathematics.

    “It was encouraging to observe that in each of these schools, the music programs are designed on the premise that musical participation affords opportunities to enrich human experience in holistic and integrated ways, valuing a balance of intrinsic and extrinsic benefits,” Dr Crawford said.

    “Australia is regarded as one of the most multicultural countries in the world, but as globalisation becomes the norm, we begin to welcome people from countries with vastly different backgrounds, experiences, ideologies, values and belief systems.

    “A reconsideration of what we teach and how is required in order to account for the social, cultural and economic differences and similarities embodied within the changing society and contemporary student cohort. Music and the arts can play a huge role in the future of inclusive, practical and life-changing education.”

    /Public Release.

The wild and wacky career of Linsey Pollak in eight memorable moments – Beat Magazine

Words by Tom Parker

Linsey Pollak takes us through the most memorable moments of his 50-odd year career.

Linsey Pollak has forged quite a career across a wide breadth of musical disciplines. Since a young kid, Pollak showed an affinity to the creative space first picking up a $20 clarinet and then quickly finding his feet as an instrument maker. It was only up from there as Pollak learned new instruments, spent time overseas immersing himself in international cultures before then bringing his knowledge back to Australia to the betterment of the local music scene. He’s been a member of large orchestras while also cutting his teeth as a solo musician “live-looping” to make his name known.

On Wednesday July 15, Pollak will appear as part of The Boite’s Song Appetit series where he will cook dinner and then share music and stories from his fascinating career. The event comes as part of The Boite’s ongoing ‘Adapt, Not Cancel’ live stream series which can be enjoyed online from your very own home.

The beginning (1964)

When I was 11 years old, my mum found a clarinet for sale for $20 in the classified ads of the local paper and bought it for me. This led me to play everything from Mozart to The Rolling Stones’ ‘Paint it Black’ with my band The Rajazz (in year 8).

Pollak’s instrument making dream (1971)

At the age of 18, I remember discovering a bamboo grove and making my first bamboo flute. I found a love for the craft which led me to drop out of my Science degree at Sydney University to become a woodwind instrument maker.

Moving to Macedonia (1975)

As my knowledge and love for music grew, I moved to Macedonia and lived there for eight months. This occurred after I heard an album featuring the Macedonian gaida (bagpipe) played by revered gaida player Pece Atanasovski. It was love at first listen and led me to make the move and study gaida with Lazo Nikolovski near Skopje, the capital city of Macedonia. This totally changed my life!

Linsey with Lazo Nikolovski 

The birth of the ‘Pipi Storm’ community arts collective (1975)

Teaching kids the art of instrument making and putting on performances, the ‘Pipi Storm’ community arts collective was born. After taking ten kids to a children’s community festival in Canberra, we eventually had 25 people on board for a project that became an important springboard for community arts development in Australia. I remember travelling down the Murray River on rafts and starting performances for kids.

On rafts travelling down the Murray 

Opening the North Perth Ethnic Music Centre (1983)

I started the North Perth Ethnic Music Centre which continued for 30 years to become the Multicultural Arts Centre of Western Australia and eventually ‘Kulcha’, a very important part of Australian multicultural music. Kulcha was known for its fantastic acoustic music venue and welcomed acts from all backgrounds to perform. It closed in 2014.

A career-defining move to Queensland (1990)

In 1990, I moved to the Sunshine Coast in Queensland with my partner Jessica and had to re-invent myself as a musician. I started live-looping solo shows which became my ‘bread and butter’ and led to me creating 11 different solo shows. This would become a large part of my artistic life from then on as I toured these shows all over Europe and Asia from 1996 to 2018.

The inventiveness of Linsey Pollak in one video

One special Woodford Folk Festival moment (2014)

One key Woodford Folk Festival moment was getting renowned Australian vocalist Lizzie O’Keefe up to jam with me in the massive 24-piece Balkan-inspired street band, ‘The Unusual Suspects’, one New Years Eve. That led to me inviting Lizzie to join me in a project called Dangerous Song (an eco-music duo) which has became one of the main musical projects of my career and still exists today.

Linsey with Lizzie O’Keefe

A Woodford homage

Woodford Folk Festival has provided many key moments over a 30-year period. It’s an amazing and inspiring festival and is iconic in its importance to Australian culture. The festival has been very supportive of my work and a great deal of my projects have had world premieres there – it has been critical to my development as a musician, as it is for many Australian musicians.

Performing ‘The Dream of Zedkat Nabu’ at Woodford Folk Festival 2012/13

Linsey Pollak will appear live as part of The Boite’s Song Appetit series on Wednesday July 15. Grab tickets to the event here. Find out more about The Boite’s ‘Adapt, Not Cancel’ series here.

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