Sampa The Great: The African voice of Australian rap – BBC News

The Return isn’t just a meditation on diaspora, discontentment, and homesickness, but a celebration of her family. The opening track, Mwana, features Sampa’s mother and her sister Mwanje. “I mean, we sing [together] all the time anyway,” Sampa cackles. “We’ve been performing for our parents in our living room since we were young so it was really beautiful.” Her sister isn’t just a guest feature but the impetus and inspiration behind Sampa’s ambassadorial role for young Africans in Australia, which at first terrified her. 

“I didn’t know the history of anything of the country itself, or the hip-hop scene, and I felt like this ambassadorial role was being thrust upon me,” she says. The first interlude of the album, Wake Up, a recorded voicemail from a friend pinpoints this moment. “Your phone’s still off,” the voicemail begins.

“Listen, I get what you’re dealing with a hundred percent

And it’s really hard and it’s rough

But we’re black

And you’re black in the music industry, no less

This is just how it is

You just have to be able to deal.”

Scott Morrison says multicultural Australia is like a ‘fragrant garam masala’ – SBS News

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has likened Australia’s multicultural society to a tasty blend of garam masala spices.

He made the comparison at a Deepavali function in Parliament’s Great Hall on Monday night, hosted by the Hindu Council of Australia.

“As I often talk about at functions like this, there are many metaphors given to explain multiculturalism in Australia, but the one I like best is garam masala,” he said.

“Getting the cloves and the black cardamom and all this, and you put it all together.

“You have any one of them on their own, rubbish. Doesn’t leave a good taste in the mouth. But when you blend them all together, you crunch them up…wow.

“And that is the fragrance that comes from Australia’s multicultural society.”

Indian people light oil lamps during the Light Festival as part of the Diwali festival celebrations in Bhopal, India.

EPA

Deepavali, or Diwali, is the Hindu festival of light and is celebrated around the world as a spiritual victory of light over darkness, knowledge over ignorance and good over evil.

Australia was the most successful multi-cultural country in the World, Mr Morrison told the Deepavali celebration.

The Indian diaspora had given an incredible amount to Australia, Mr Morrison added.

“There is so much that we share together. Democracy, language, and even a national day.

“The links in history between our peoples are great, through both peace and war. We are the most successful multicultural country on earth, in Australia.”

Mr Morrison also used his speech to touch on the wartime history linking Australia and India.

“There is more to acknowledge in this relationship. We often speak of the 26,000 Australians who were casualties at Gallipoli.

“But what we don’t often speak of is the 1400 Indians who fell and the more than 3500 who were wounded in that battle side by side with our Anzacs.”

Performers pose for photograhs during Diwali celebrations at Federation Square in Melbourne.

AAP

Mr Morrison also told a story about Indian soldiers watching German and Allied troops spontaneously celebrating Christmas on the Western Front during World War I.

“On Christmas Eve of 1914 they were dug in near a French village. And then something odd happened. The guns fell silent and music could be heard from the German lines.

“There was the Christmas truce. A spontaneous act of peace and compassion seen up and down the Western Front.

“The Indians looked on as the Germans began to place small, candlelit trees along their trenches.

“And while that reminded those of the Christian faith of Christmas, those lights reminded those of the Hindu faith of Deepavali.”

Nexus Arts reveals new leadership team – The Adelaide Review

Nexus Arts reveals new leadership team – The Adelaide Reviewhe Adelaide ReviewFacebookTwitterhe Adelaide Reviewacebooknstagramwitter

Nexus Arts’ music programs manager Emily Tulloch will take up the role of artistic director in a leadership reshuffle that will see the organisation continue its pivot to supporting ‘intercultural’ collaboration.

Announced this week, Emily Tulloch will step into the role of artistic director, while film academic Dr Blythe Chandler will take over as Nexus Arts’ new general manager. This latest appointment follows previous executive director Louise Dunn’s move in July from Nexus Arts to its Lion Arts Centre neighbour ACE Open, a change precipitated by the departure of ACE Open’s founding CEO Liz Nowell.

While Tulloch’s previous role focussed on Nexus’ musical offerings, as artistic director she will also oversee the organisation’s visual arts program and gallery space. The junction between visual and performing arts is something Tulloch already has experience in exploring, particularly through her work with Zephyr Quartet.

“It just reminded me how much music can benefit from connecting with the place of its creation, that spatial aspect,” she says of a recent Zephyr Quartet performance down the road at Samstag Museum of Art, that saw the ensemble perform a response to Louise Haselton’s SALA Festival exhibition like cures like in situ among the work. “Personally I feel there’s a great synergy between art forms, and there’s a really natural, beautiful way that music and visual art can interact and provoke one another.”

Emily Tulloch performs as part of Zephyr Quartet: Domestic Alchemy, Samstag Museum of Art, 2019 (Photo: Sia Duff)

In her new role Tulloch says she hopes to continue Nexus’ shift from a ‘multicultural’ space – the organisation dropped the word from its title last year – to one focussed on fostering an ‘intercultural’ society. “That’s the word that has been a changing point for Nexus, moving towards an understanding of ‘interculturalism’, of understanding our diverse country,” Tulloch says. “That just slightly changes the focus to cultures working together as opposed to ‘multiculturalism’, which, while celebrating and supporting individual cultures, can have the effect of siloing them.

“What I’ve been really interested in my programming is promoting new work that brings together artists of diverse backgrounds to work together in the creation of new work that [bridges] their various genre or artistic heritages – whether that’s musical heritages or cultural ones – to create something that could be called distinctively new or ‘Australian’ work, that reflects the diverse cultures that we know our nation is made up of.”

Emily Tulloch and Dr Blythe Chandler (Photo: Emma Luker)

That push is reflected in Tulloch’s 2019 programming choices, from the July premiere of a specially commissioned collaboration between guzheng player Zhao Liang and drummer Jarrad Payne, to the upcoming pairing of Filipino and Aboriginal rapper DOBBY and Adelaide-based folk singer Naomi Keyte on 2 November as part of OzAsia Festival.

“The work we’re doing is contemporary in nature, but that doesn’t mean that artists who work in a contemporary fashion don’t draw on their heritage or traditional methods. So there is still a place for us to connect with community and to be presenting work that reflects and represents the diversity of Australia, that is also looking forward, particularly in terms of intercultural thinking.”

nexusarts.org.au